New Writing Series 2021: Modernist Place and Space

Our New Writing Series consists of pieces that engage with how modernism deals with the experience of space, place, localities and their interstices.

Below are the pieces so far in the series:

Elektropolis Coked to the Eyeballs: Berlin’s Modernist Identity Crisis

By Casey Lawrence, Trinity College Dublin In this month’s MSI New Writing about place in Modernism, TCD’s Casey Lawrence uncovers Berlin of the Modernist period, at once impoverished and decadent, as seen through the eyes of the oft-forgotten writer Robert McAlmon Berlin underwent significant changes and took many names during La Belle Époque: The Garrison… Continue reading Elektropolis Coked to the Eyeballs: Berlin’s Modernist Identity Crisis

Hong Kong: The Archaeology of a Modernist City

By Dr. Emily Ridge, NUI Galway In the latest of MSI’s 2021 series of writing about place in Modernism, NUI Galway’s Emily Ridge explores Hong Kong’s architecture and literature, and the traces of modernism within a postmodern “heterotopia”. To me, Hong Kong has always more immediately evoked a postmodern rather than a modernist aesthetic. When,… Continue reading Hong Kong: The Archaeology of a Modernist City

The crossbones of Galway, modernist vortex

By Adrian Paterson, NUI Galway In the second of MSI’s 2021 series of writing about place in Modernism, NUI Galway’s Adrian Paterson explores modernism’s connections to Galway – a place not immediately obvious as one for modernist pilgrimage. Time and space in the modernist period always collided and colluded, even before Einstein’s Special Theory of… Continue reading The crossbones of Galway, modernist vortex

“How can you own water really?”: rivers, (cash)flow and Ulysses

by Chris McCann, NUI Galway This is the first of MSI’s 2021 series of writing about place in Modernism. In honour of Bloomsday, NUI Galway’s Chris McCann explores the relationship between two Dublin rivers and commercial interests in the city’s built landscape. Despite the obvious centrality of water to Joyce’s Finnegans Wake, watercourses are also… Continue reading “How can you own water really?”: rivers, (cash)flow and Ulysses